On the Reality of How Disgusting Our Sin Is and How We Offend God’s Goodness and Majesty

In order to attack our sin at the root, to make a serious effort to eradicate all mortal and willed venial sin (remember to be a sin, we must willfully consent to it), we must ponder deeply on how much of an offense it is to our dear God.  Let us hear from our wise teacher Father Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalene on sin: “If we wish to have a better understanding of…sin, we must consider its disastrous effects. One single sin instantly changed Lucifer, the angel of light, into an angel of darkness, and into the eternal enemy of God.  A single sin deprived Adam and Eve of the state of Grace and friendship with God, taking away all their supernatural gifts and condemning them to death together with the rest of mankind. One single sin was enough to make an abyss between God and man, to deprive the whole human race of any possibility of union with God.

“The Passion of Jesus is a further proof of the great malice and destructive power of sin. The lacerated members of Christ, His sorrowful death on the Cross, proclaim that sin is a form of deicide.  Jesus, the most beautiful of the sons of men, through sin, became the “despised and the most abject of men, a man of sorrows…He was bruised for our sins”, so that “from the sole of His foot unto the top of His head, there is no sound part”.  Sin made Christ a martyr and brought Him to His death…He wished to vanquish death and restore Divine friendship to man.

“Jesus, our Head, invites us, His members, to unite with Him in His work of destroying sin: to destroy it in ourselves down to the very roots, that is, in our evil inclinations, and to destroy it likewise in His other members by allowing Him to work in us. This is the law of solidarity, for the misfortune of one is the misfortune of the others; each sin is a burden on the whole world and disturbs the equilibrium of God’s plan. Therefore every Christian…must throw himself ardently into the battle against sin and fight it with the proper weapons: penance, expiatory prayer, and most of all, love.  When the love of Charity is perfect, it destroys sin more efficaciously than the fire of purgatory.  In this we see why the saints were able to convert so many souls. God used the fire of their charity to (help sinners overcome their) sin.”

Saint Teresa of Avila once pondered on how bold we are to offend God and she exclaimed: “How is it Lord that we are cowards in everything except in opposing You?  To this the children of Adam devote all their energies…O Incomprehensible Wisdom!  In truth, You need all the Love which You have for us creatures to enable You to endure our folly, and to await our recovery…O Lord, what hardness of heart!…We are distressed if we lose anything, the merest trifle. Then why are we not distressed at losing that great Treasure, which is the Majesty of God, in which our enjoyment of Him will be endless. Why is this? Why is this?…My God cure such great folly and blindness…The loss of so many souls hurts me so much that I am beside myself. I cry to You Lord, and I beseech You to give me the means of contributing to the winning of souls by my prayers…It seems to me that I would willingly sacrifice a thousand lives to save even one of the many souls which are being lost!  I believe, Lord, that You treasure one soul that we gain for You by our prayers and works, thanks to Your Mercy, MORE THAN ALL the other services that we can offer you!” (Emphasis added).

Our great Saint also had this gem for us to constantly meditate upon: “Can anything be considered small if it offends God?

St. Fuastina also gives us further insight into the horror of our sin and the Mercy of God: “In an instant, all of God’s Graces appeared before the eyes of my soul….I went before the Blessed Sacrament, and like the greatest and most miserable of wretches, I begged for His Mercy that He might heal and purify my soul. Then I heard these words: “My daughter, all your miseries have been consumed in the Flame of My Love, like a little twig thrown into a roaring fire. By humbling yourself in this way, you draw down upon yourself and upon other souls an entire sea of Mercy.”

You will recognize the message of Elizabeth Kindelmann in this meditation, because it is always about souls and Love!  Are we willing to finally accept God’s Grace and Mercy?  Are we willing to trust and persevere that He will do all which is necessary within us?  Are we willing to give a little more today?  We can not do it, but He can….if we just truly repent, constantly humble ourselves before Him and submit our will and every aspect of our lives to His Will.  Yes, Lord I am a miserable sinner, but I love You!  With Your Grace, I will persevere in Love!  Jesus, I trust in You!  May our glances profoundly penetrate each other!  May our lips beg together Mercy from the Eternal Father!  Fiat!

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2 Responses to On the Reality of How Disgusting Our Sin Is and How We Offend God’s Goodness and Majesty

  1. What a powerful reflection we have here. This line, in particular, struck me with great force, reminding me of my earlier reflections on original sin: “…each sin is a burden on the whole world and disturbs the equilibrium of God’s plan.” Thus, there is really no “small, inconsequential sin.” Every sin skews the order of the universe and disturbs God’s plan. That being said, how touching St. Theresa’s cries for a single soul–what loss. How motivated we should be to do the least thing with love to contribute to the salvation of souls. How consoling Jesus’ words to St. Faustina: ““My daughter, all your miseries have been consumed in the Flame of My Love, like a little twig thrown into a roaring fire. By humbling yourself in this way, you draw down upon yourself and upon other souls an entire sea of Mercy.”

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